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Istanbul (Turkey): view from the Galata Tower across the Golden Horn.
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Córdoba (Spain): view of the Roman bridge across the river Guadalquivir.
Sylt (Germany)
Castle of Alaró (Mallorca, Spain)
Old bridge across the Guadalqivir river near Italica (Spain)
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Roman amphitheatre in Italica near Sevilla (Spain)
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Silver Jubilee Award of the International Federation of Landscape Architects Europe

CIVILSCAPE founding member awarded Council of Europe

Oslo – 19 Oct. 2014 |  The 35 National Associations of the European Region of the International Federation of Landscape Architects - IFLA EUROPE, have granted the Silver Jubilee ‘Landscape and Democracy Award’ to the Council of Europe at their General Assembly held in Oslo, Norway, on 19 October 2014.

The ‘Landscape and Democracy Award’ for Mr Thorbjørn Jagland, Secretary General of the Council of Europe, was presented by Mr Michael Oldham, first President of IFLA Europe, in the presence of Mrs Liv Kristine Mortensen, President of the Council of Europe Conference of the European Landscape Convention, Mrs Ana Luengo, President of IFLA-Europe, Mrs Marina Cervera, Secretary General of IFLA-Europe and the Representatives of the National Associations of IFLA-Europe.

The Award was given to Mrs Maguelonne Déjeant-Pons, Executive Secretary of the European Landscape Convention, who represented the Secretary General on this occasion. CIVILSCAPE congratulates on this occasion. The Council of Europe has been the cradle of territorial democracy in Europe. The European Landscape Convention is the key document in this important policy field that promotes peoples involvement and participation. People must have a say on their landscape.

Landscape is also the source of identity and the mirror of societies. The question of who has the right to decide about the future of our landscapes is a highly political one – and also a highly emotional one. Are it the politicians, the forces of economy and lobby organizations, the land owners or the people who live in a region – and what voice do all the other people have, who know and love a landscape, who go there for holiday or feel related to it through their own history, that of their family or social group. These are difficult questions and they touch the heart of the key principles of the Council of Europe: human rights, rule of the law and democracy, especially participative democracy. The European Landscape Convention does tackle these questions and tries to give answers, not in a mandatory stile, but in setting a framework for good practices in decision making, governance, policy making and participation of all relevant groups. This makes the European Landscape Convention so powerful and so attractive to civil society. This is the reason, why CIVILSCAPE and their member organisations were explicitly founded on the principles of the European Landscape Convention.

It also makes the European Landscape Convention attractive to other international bodies. The European Union just recently has implemented the Convention into the regulations for the Environment Impact Assessment – the most important tool for planning in the EU. It were the NGOs who had advocated for this decision, it was taken up by the European Commission and finally adopted by the European Parliament. The EU Commission has adopted a Green Infrastructure Strategy, 'to promote the deployment of green infrastructure in the EU in urban and rural areas'. From its substance and ideas this important document a quite close to the European Landscape Convention. Even when it carefuly avoids in its wording landscape, the strategy could be easily used for the implementation of the ELC on European level. The European Landscape Convention is discussed within the Rio 20+ process and serves as a model for the United Nations to draft a global landscape convention. It is a powerful tool, but even within the Council of Europe and the signatory states we still have to advocate it and show its potential and benefits. CIVILSCAPE believes that awarding the Council of Europe not only reflects the enonormus work and succes story of the European Landscape Convention. Furthermore it highlights how important it is that the Council of Europe has taken and - after a serious review of its political agenda - is still taking responsibility for the territorial democracy.

The European Landscape Convention points us to a path of co-operation between all the actors in the field, mainly the public administration and policy on one side and the civil society and NGOs on the other: because we need to work hand in hand in these fundamental matters for our future, not in total harmony and single mindedness, but in a well organized and moderated dialogue and permanent debate, an exchange of ideas and a competition for the best models for our future landscapes – and our future societies. Experts and professionals like landscape architects and planners have by profession an important role in this context.

 

Further Information

CIVILSCAPE Office Bonn
Dirk Gotzmann
Adenauerallee 68
53113 Bonn
Germany
Tel.: +49 (228) 299711-00 or -01
Fax: +49 (228) 299711-09
E-Mail: dirk.gotzmann@civilscape.eu

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English version
The following pages are (partly) published only in English. We apologize for any inconvenience.
You are welcome to support us in our efforts to translate the CivilScape web site to different languages.